Lent Madness: Brigid of Kildare vs. Kamehameha

March 25, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Brigid of Kildare vs. Kamehameha

Lent Madness 2015Francis of Assisi is the first to make the Faithful Four, trouncing Thecla 71% to 29%  Lent Madness site. On the St. Luke’s site, we sent Thecla home too with only 33% of the vote.

The next match up is Brigid of Kildare vs. Kamehameha.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

brigid-ceramic-200x300Brigid of Kildare

As a patron saint of both Ireland and beer, Brigid has much merchandise to her name. For starters, the depictions of Brigid one can procure are as numerous and as varied as the Irish diaspora.

Here’s one in ceramic tile work, in the style of the American Southwest (of course!) It is complete with a little flame above her head, and a butter churn for all her dairy-related miracles.

If you can’t find a commercially available depiction to suit your needs, there are online classes devoted exclusively to making your own Brigid-collage....Read more here.

StainedGlass2-130x300Kamehameha IV
Kamehameha IV may have reigned for less than a decade, and he may have died as a young man at only 29 years old, but over 100 years later, his legacy and lasting marks can be seen clearly. His imprint remains on the Hawaiian Islands, and images of him, often with his much-loved wife Queen Emma and their young son Prince Albert, are still prominently evident.

Kamehameha IV is credited with being foundational in introducing Anglicanism to the Hawaiian Islands, and one of his great accomplishments is that he translated the Book of Common Prayer into the local language. So it is fitting that, at the Cathedral of St. Andrew in Honolulu, the church they were instrumental in
establishing, a stained glass window depicting him and his queen fills the pews with heavenly light....Read more here.

Lent Madness: Thecla vs. Francis of Assisi

March 24, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Thecla vs. Francis of Assisi

Lent Madness 2015 From the Lent Madness site: “Yesterday, Egeria defeated Thomas Ken 54% to 46% to nab the final spot.” On the St. Luke’s site, Egeria was also the clear  winner, running away with 75% of the votes.

The next match up is Thecla vs. Francis of Assisi. This is going to be a toughie today.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

thecla-totebag-300x300Thecla

You may anticipate, Lent Madness reader, that Thecla – proclaimed as an “Equal-to-the-Apostles” and honored as a saint since the time of the early church – would be devoid of saintly kitsch. All hope would seem to be lost, especially when paired against Saint Francis, the saint whose face inspired a thousand birdbaths. With Thecla being most highly venerated in Eastern Christianity – a tradition not particularly known for turning its saints into garden gnomes – some kitsch would, it seem, be missing for Thecla in this round of Lent Madness.

But that, dear friends, is why Zazzle and Etsy exist. Truly, it seems, there is no member of the communion of saints beyond plastering on a tote bag. Thecla, revered for her own self-denial, may have travelled light, following in the footsteps of Saint Paul, but that won’t prevent her from helping you carry home your latest purchases from the supermarket in this sophisticated canvas tote bag...Read more here.

StFrancisGrottoBirdBath100GKC090Francis of Assisi
Faithful Lent Madness readers, Francis, whose life and ministry preached the Gospel both with and without words, gives us such a rich tapestry of love, faith, and adventures that the kitsch is most certainly strong with this one. Sure, he didn’t hang with someone named Paul in the New Testament, but his feast day ups most average Sunday attendance figures if clergy count the two and four-legged souls in church at the Blessing of the Animals.

After all, not every saint has the gravitas or the holy presence to be the final perfect touch for a garden. This particular birdbath captures Francis in the holy position of orans, blessing the water and birdseed for the very birds who set quite the high standard for a flock listening to a sermon. Squirrels, a lamb, a wolf, and bunnies listen in rapt attention. Bunnies. Bunnies loved this man!...Read more here.

Lent Madness: Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater

March 13, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater

Lent Madness 2015 As the Lent Madness site said, “Brendan the Navigator finally lost his way, losing to Thecla 62% to 38%.” Despite a vocal and large Irish contingent, Brendan also lost on the St. Luke’s blog, 36% to Thecla’s 64%.

The next match up in the Saintly Sixteen is Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

Prince_Alexander_Liholiho_with_leis-218x300Kamehameha

Kamehameha is renowned for his many ministries – from introducing Anglicanism to the Hawaiian Islands to translating the Book of Common Prayer into the local vernacular. Another of his lasting legacies throughout Hawaii was the pioneering steps he instigated for the betterment of the health and welfare of his people.

Kamehameha IV was born Alexander Iolani Liholiho on February 9, 1834 and was crowned King just shy of his 21st birthday.

With his wife and partner in reform, Queen Emma, Kamehameha set forth to transform the Hawaiian Islands by offering his people new, modern ways of life. He was devoted to introducing modern healthcare methods and facilities. Perhaps his drive was based on the healthcare issues that touched him and his family.Read more here.

200px-Making_medicine.portraitDavid Oakerhater

David Pendleton Oakerhater, an Episcopal deacon and the first Native American saint, was an accomplished artist and a leader in an art style known as Ledger art.

A Cheyenne Indian of Oklahoma, Oakerhater was imprisoned by the United States Army in Florida beginning in 1875. During this imprisonment, an education was provided for all the Native American prisoners that included language, Christianity and art.

Furnished with some instructions and art supplies like pencils, ink, paints, crayons, and paper, Oakerhater delved into art as his new form of expression. Using pens, he and the other prisoners drew in ledger books, hence the name of the art form.

Ledger art is defined as a Native American drawing or painting on paper or cloth. Historians report that Ledger art was popular from the Civil War through World War I.Read more here.

Lent Madness: Brendan the Navigator vs. Thecla

March 12, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Brendan the Navigator vs. Thecla

Lent Madness 2015

In the Barbie vs. Ken match up, Barbara was vanquished 33% to Thomas Ken’s 67%. on the Lent Madness site. Thomas Ken also won on the St. Luke’s blog site, but by a narrower margin 54% to 46%.

With Barbara sent home yesterday, today begins the Saintly Sixteen! Today’s first match up in the Saintly Sixteen is Brendan the Navigator vs. Thecla.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

St-Brendan-2-247x300Brendan the Navigator

Brendan lived a long a full life in service to God. His courageous and adventurous spirit led him to the ends of the world. The many hagiographies written to honor him speak to the inspiration he provided to the faithful. Even the most fantastic stories give a glimpse of his extraordinary character.

As Brendan and his friends set out to sea he insisted that they follow Jesus’ command to the seventy that they bring no provisions, trusting that God would provide all their needs. He encouraged his fellow travelers, “Fear not, brothers, for our God will be to us a helper, a mariner, and a pilot; take the oars and helm, keep the sails set, and may God do unto us, his servants and his little vessel, as he wills.”….Read more here.

thecla-petsalion-220x300Thecla

Thecla is among the earliest saints of the church, and is often referred to as “Equal-to-the-Apostles,” for the fervor of her witness to Jesus Christ and the power of her example.

While the story of her life as documented in the Acts of Paul and Thecla may raise a few eyebrows – with its scintillating accounts of Thecla twice making miraculous escapes from martyrdom, including a notable self-baptism by throwing herself into a pool filled with ravenous seals – Thecla’s life and ministry made an undeniable and well-documented impact on the early church.

The great Cappadocian Father Gregory of Nyssa hailed Thecla as an example of holiness and asceticism in one of his homilies, writing that “she undertook the sacrifice of herself, by giving death to the flesh and practicing great austerities, extinguishing in herself all earthly affections, so that nothing seemed to remain living in her but reason and spirit.”.Read more here.

Lent Madness: William Laud vs. Kamehameha

February 25, 2015 § 2 Comments

Lent Madness 2012On the Lent Madness site, Thecla kicked John Keble to the curb with a 58% win over Keble’s 42%. On the St. Luke’s site, however, a complete draw between Thecla and Keble with each capturing 50%!

Today’s match up is William Laud vs. Kamehameha.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

 

William_Laud-226x300William Laud

William Laud was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633–1640 and remains among the most controversial figures in the history of Anglicanism. Heralded by many as a martyr and condemned by others as a tyrant and bigot, Laud was among the most visible proponents of a uniquely English brand of anti-Calvinism in the seventeenth-century Church. As such, he was in near constant conflict with English Puritans of his day..…Read more here.

 

220px-KamehamehaIVKamehameha

On January 11, 1855 Hawaii crowned a new, young monarch — King Kamehameha IV.

With his wife Queen Emma, Kamehameha set forth to transform the Hawaiian islands by offering his people a new way, new healthcare methods, and a new faith — Christianity.

Kamehameha was born on February 9, 1834. As a young man, he toured the United States, Central America, and Europe, and he discovered Christianity — and Anglicanism in particular....Read more here.

Lent Madness: John Keble vs. Thecla

February 24, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: John Keble vs. Thecla

Lent Madness 2012

On the Lent Madness site: Juan Diego advanced to the Saintly Sixteen with a 57% to 43% victory over Hadewijch. He’ll face the winner of Dorcas vs. Frederick Douglass.  On the St. Luke’s site, however, Hadewijch won 54% over Juan Diego’s 46% in a very close race!

Today’s match up is John Keble vs. Thecla.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

john-keble1John Keble

Though devoted to his calling as a country priest, serving for thirty years as the vicar of Hursley, John Keble is best known as an influential founder of the Oxford Movement. This movement sought to renew the Church of England through a better understanding and adherence to the practices of the early church. In 1833 he preached the Assize Sermon, soon published with the provocative title “National Apostasy.” Keble was a key player in the Oxford Movement and wrote nine of the ninety Tracts for the Times. In addition to writing poetry, tracts, and sermons, Keble also translated the works of Iranaeus and prepared a three-volume edition of the works of Richard Hooker.…Read more here.

 

Image 1Thecla

Thecla was a follower of the Apostle Paul, whose life was recorded in the Acts of Paul and Thecla, a prominent piece of early Christian literature.

This book recounted a missionary journey of Paul to Iconium, where he was proclaiming “the word of God about abstinence and the resurrection.” Thecla, upon hearing Paul’s message, found herself enraptured. Her devotion to Paul and his teaching so deeply concerned her mother and fiancé (worried that she would follow Paul’s demands to live in chastity), they formed a mob and imprisoned Paul...Read more here.

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