Lent Madness: Egeria vs. Thomas Ken

March 23, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Egeria vs. Thomas Ken

Lent Madness 2015 Bernard Mizeki won 52% over Jackson Kemper’s 48%  Lent Madness site.  On the St. Luke’s site, Brigid also won by 60% to Dionysius’s 40%. Bernard Mizeki also won on the St. Luke’s site 67% to 33%!

The next match up is Egeria vs. Thomas Ken.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

egeria-2Egeria

Egeria was a Spanish nun who traveled throughout the Holy Land and the Near East from 381-384 CE, recording what she saw and experienced. Her letters home provide the earliest record of Christian liturgy during Holy Week that we have.

It is, however, not only liturgy enthusiasts who are Egeria fans. Medieval scholars also appreciate her, because her writing is the oldest example of non-church Latin in existence, and provides us with exciting glimpses of how the language developed. Are you a fan of the word “the?” So was Egeria! She was one of the first writers to use it...Read more here.

thomas-ken-image-244x300Thomas Ken

Thomas Ken was a celebrated preacher, writer, and teacher. His works have endured through the years, though perhaps his most noted piece of writing is the doxology sung at so many parishes as gifts are being brought forward, “Praise God, from Whom all blessings flow; Praise Him, all creatures here below; Praise Him above, ye heavenly host; Praise Father, Son, and Holy Ghost.” This line, in so many ways, summarizes Ken’s focus in life and ministry.

He was focused on the source of true gifts and unswayed by blandishments, bribes, or intimidation. His abiding faith in the Triune God as the grounding of his life gave him a prophetic courage to speak truth no matter the cost to his career. Lord McCauley (an ecclesiastical opponent) said of Ken, “His character approaches, as near as human infirmity permits, to the ideal of perfection of Christian virtue.”...Read more here.

Lent Madness: Bernard Mizeki vs. Jackson Kemper

March 20, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Bernard Mizeki vs. Jackson Kemper

Lent Madness 2015 From the Lent Madness site: “Yesterday, Brigid of Kildare took care of Dionysius the (evidently-not-so) Great 63% to 37% and will square off against Kamehameha in the next round.” On the St. Luke’s site, Brigid also won by 60% to Dionysius’s 40%.

The next match up is Bernard Mizeki vs. Jackson Kemper.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

saint-bernard-mizekiBernard Mizeki

Bernard Mizeki’s commitment to proclaiming the Gospel to the people of Africa led to his untimely death. Yet his courage, sacrifice, and commitment inspires thousands to gather every year to celebrate his life.

In 2013 Bernard Mizeki’s festival was held at his shrine for the first time in over five years. Before that the event had taken place in an area located about seven miles away due to the actions of former bishop Nolbert Kunonga, who barred any pilgrims from the shrine.

This festival gathers over 20,000 people for two days to dance, sing, and pray. After a religious service, thousands of pilgrims swarm to the hill where it is believed the body of Bernard Mizeki miraculously disappeared. Pilgrims draw water from the nearby stream believed to have been used to clean out Bernard Mizeki’s wounds. The water is believed to hold healing qualities...Read more here.

B_2YnRDUIAAKWPz-169x300Jackson Kemper

The indefatigable Jackson Kemper established much of the Episcopal Church of the Midwest, including the Dioceses of Kansas, Missouri, Indiana, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota, as well as the seminary Nashotah House.

He is memorialized in churches throughout the region, as in this stained glass window from St. Paul’s, Kansas City, Missouri. In the lower left-hand corner, he is riding a horse — a fitting tribute, as he covered a territory of 450,000 miles, mostly by horseback.

He also appears in the novel The Deacon as a ghost who haunts Grace Church, Madison, Wisconsin. He might not have liked being fictionalized. According to his biographer, “He did not care for Shakespeare, and abhorred Byron.” He did, however, enjoy the occasional novel (“particularly, it is remembered, Judge Haliburton’s ‘Sam Slick’”) and “let his children read Scott’s romances, but not too many of them at a time, fearing lest they should acquire a taste for fiction.”Read more here.

Lent Madness: Egeria vs. Hildegard

March 5, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Egeria vs. Hildegard

Lent Madness 2015Kemper killed it Lent Madness site,  winning over Kempe  74% to 26%. On the St. Luke’s site, however, we were a bit kinder to Kempe, but ultimately Kempe won 67% to 37%.

Today’s match up is Egeria vs. Hildegard.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

 

egeria-3Egeria

Egeria gives us the earliest glimpse we have into organized Christian practice and belief.

We don’t know much about who she was, exactly. Many say she was a Spanish nun, which makes sense given her unusually high level of literacy — and the way she addressed those she wrote to as sisters. Others point out she must have been an unusual sort of nun, if she was a nun at all. Her letters were detailed and practical, betraying none of the fascination with the miraculous and fanciful that some other clerical pilgrims loved. And what sort of nun was free to travel around the known world for years at a time? Possibly this made her a sort of wandering monastic — additionally unusual for her time. Or maybe she was a very devout noblewoman, called to pilgrimage, who wrote letters home to other devout women at her church….Read more here.

Hildegard_von_Bingen-300x257Hildegard

Hildegard of Bingen is one of the most accomplished women in church history. The twelfth-century abbess was a mystic, theologian, composer, cloistered nun, and autodidact who wrote one of the largest bodies of letters to survive from the Middle Ages.

Born into a noble family and sickly from birth, Hildegard experienced visions beginning in early childhood. Perhaps because of them, her family dedicated her to the church; her fellow brides of Christ recognized her gifts for leadership, unanimously voting her abbess.Read more here.

Lent Madness: Jackson Kemper vs. Margery Kempe

March 4, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Jackson Kemper vs. Margery Kempe

Lent Madness 2015Elizabeth won in no uncertain terms on the Lent Madness site,  sending  Brigid home 68% to 32%. On the St. Luke’s site, however, we had a dead heat between these two women reflecting the difficulty of voting between such two formidable women.

Today’s match up is Jackson Kemper vs. Margery Kempe. “Sometimes matchups exist solely because the SEC likes the names involved.” It’s hard to contain the mirth of the Supreme Executive Committee, folks.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

 

unnamed-222x300Jackson Kemper

The seemingly inexhaustible Jackson Kemper served as the first missionary bishop in The Episcopal Church,working over the course of a thirty-five-year ministry in such untamed wilderness territories as Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, and especially Wisconsin, where he established the Nashotah House seminary and eventually made his home.....Read more here.

 

unnamed2Margery Kempe

The first autobiography written in English is something of a mystical revelation, travel diary, opinion essay, theological discourse, and personal diary all in one. Margery Kempe, who lived in the late-fourteenth to early-fifteenth century, was a middle-class woman living in Norfolk in eastern England.

She began The Book of Margery Kemperecalling a series of crises during and after her pregnancy. She felt tempted by the devil not to confess her sins. In response, she fasted, performed acts of charity, and…Read more here.

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