Lent Madness: Cuthbert vs. Molly Brant

March 16, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Cuthbert vs. Molly Brant

Lent Madness 2015Kamehameha ran off with the votes, 61% to David Oakerhater’s 39% on the Lent Madness site. But on the St. Luke’s site, David Oakerhater eeked out a win 54% to 46%.

The next match up in the Saintly Sixteen is Cuthbert vs. Molly Brant.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

cuthbertCuthbert

Perhaps the most beautiful thing that is said of Saint Cuthbert is, “Cuthbert sought to follow Christ.” In this he is like many of the saints but his pattern of life was uniquely Christ-like in ways that shine forth through the centuries. No fewer than 22 lives of Cuthbert were written in the Middle Ages and his Christ-focused living is an example to all Christians.

In a Kingdom awash in both great violence and wealth, Cuthbert’s counter-cultural simplicity and kindness were a source of powerful spiritual inspiration. Stories were long told of the miracles of his life but also of enduring import were stories of his very human kindness. Upon his death, his legend grew and a significant cult emerged around his memory and relics..Read more here.

8fdb5086-619a-4ea0-b146-995510eff36c-250x300Molly Brant

Even as a young child, Molly Brant exhibited a gift for leadership. In 1754, at the age of 18, Molly traveled with her stepfather and other Mohawk leaders to Philadelphia to contest the fraudulent sale of Native territory. It was there, historians believe, that Molly got her first taste in the art of negotiation and compromise.

Molly continued to put these skills to use when she became a wife, mother (to 8 children!), and tribal leader. She frequently led the Bureau of Indian Affairs on behalf of her common-law husband Sir William Johnson when he was away. Although Molly received an education from Christian missionaries and was a devout Anglican, she retained a respectful devotion to many Mohawk customs, which allowed her to serve as a consensus-builder between two nations..Read more here.

Lent Madness: Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater

March 13, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater

Lent Madness 2015 As the Lent Madness site said, “Brendan the Navigator finally lost his way, losing to Thecla 62% to 38%.” Despite a vocal and large Irish contingent, Brendan also lost on the St. Luke’s blog, 36% to Thecla’s 64%.

The next match up in the Saintly Sixteen is Kamehameha vs. David Oakerhater.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

Prince_Alexander_Liholiho_with_leis-218x300Kamehameha

Kamehameha is renowned for his many ministries – from introducing Anglicanism to the Hawaiian Islands to translating the Book of Common Prayer into the local vernacular. Another of his lasting legacies throughout Hawaii was the pioneering steps he instigated for the betterment of the health and welfare of his people.

Kamehameha IV was born Alexander Iolani Liholiho on February 9, 1834 and was crowned King just shy of his 21st birthday.

With his wife and partner in reform, Queen Emma, Kamehameha set forth to transform the Hawaiian Islands by offering his people new, modern ways of life. He was devoted to introducing modern healthcare methods and facilities. Perhaps his drive was based on the healthcare issues that touched him and his family.Read more here.

200px-Making_medicine.portraitDavid Oakerhater

David Pendleton Oakerhater, an Episcopal deacon and the first Native American saint, was an accomplished artist and a leader in an art style known as Ledger art.

A Cheyenne Indian of Oklahoma, Oakerhater was imprisoned by the United States Army in Florida beginning in 1875. During this imprisonment, an education was provided for all the Native American prisoners that included language, Christianity and art.

Furnished with some instructions and art supplies like pencils, ink, paints, crayons, and paper, Oakerhater delved into art as his new form of expression. Using pens, he and the other prisoners drew in ledger books, hence the name of the art form.

Ledger art is defined as a Native American drawing or painting on paper or cloth. Historians report that Ledger art was popular from the Civil War through World War I.Read more here.

Lent Madness: Teresa of Avila vs. David Oakerhater

February 20, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Teresa of Avila vs. David Oakerhater

LM_Widget_HOur first match up with Lent Madness was on! Yesterday’s results mirrored the Lent Madness results. On the Lent Madness site, Brendan won 61% vs. 39%. On the blog, Brendan also won with a higher percentage of 75% vs. 25%!

Today’s match up is between Teresa of Avila vs. David Oakerhater.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

unnamedTeresa of Avila

Not many seven-year-olds run away to accept martyrdom among the Moors, but not many children grow up to become a Doctor of the Church, either. Teresa de Cependa y Ahumada, known as Teresa of Avila, was born in 1515 to a wealthy Spanish family.

When her mother died, she found solace in intense devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Like many young girls of her age, she was also passionate about romance novels and fashion…Read more here.

 

 

DPOphoto009David Oakerhater

David Pendleton Oakerhater was a Cheyenne Indian of Oklahoma, a warrior who fought for Native American rights and land against an encroaching American government. He also was a U.S. Army prisoner, an artist, an Episcopal deacon, and the first Native American saint in the Church.

Born in the 1840s in what is now Oklahoma, Oakerhater was raised in the Cheyenne traditions. He joined his tribe in conflicts and was captured and imprisoned in a Florida fort…..Read more here.

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