Lent Madness: Juan Diego vs. Frederick Douglass

March 17, 2015 § 1 Comment

Lent Madness 2015Molly Brant eked out a victory on the Lent Madness site winning 51%. But on the St. Luke’s site, Cuthbert won 54% to 46%.

The next match up in the Saintly Sixteen is Juan Diego vs. Frederick Douglass.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

unnamed-227x300Juan Diego

Juan Diego, raised according to the Aztec pagan religion, showed an unusual and mystical sense of life even prior to hearing the Gospel from missionaries. It is said that before the famous apparition of the Virgin Mary, Juan Diego was a virtuous man who led such an exemplary life that people often asked him to intercede for them in prayer.

On December 9, 1531, Juan Diego experienced that apparition in which he asked the Virgin her name. She responded in his native language of Nahuatl, “Tlecuatlecupe,” which means “the one who crushes the head of the serpent” (side note: the serpent was a very important symbol in Aztec religion! Coincidence?!?) “Tlecuatlecupe” when correctly pronounced, sounds very similar to “Guadalupe.”Read more here.

Douglass-at-work-207x300Frederick Douglass

Throughout Frederick Douglass’ life, literature and Holy Scripture remained an ever-present force. After his escape from slavery, Douglass, who was born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, renamed himself after a character in Walter Scott’s The Lady of the Lake. His sense of mission was inspired by the prophetic words of Old Testament Scripture.

Regarding the Civil War, Douglass wrote, “Civil war was not a mere strife for territory and dominion, but a contest of civilization against barbarism.” After the Civil War, Douglass brought attention to the rise of lynchings in the Deep South and the ongoing racism that prevented the economic and social advancement of African Americans. He was also an outspoken advocate for female suffrage. Hours before his death Douglass stood alongside suffragist Susan B. Anthony and Methodist minister and physician Anna Howard Shaw as they rallied for women’s voting rights. Regarding the matter, Douglass once wrote in his newspaper The North Star, “Right is of no Sex — Truth is of no Color. God is the Father of us all, and we are all Brethren.”Read more here.

Lent Madness: Cuthbert vs. Molly Brant

March 16, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Cuthbert vs. Molly Brant

Lent Madness 2015Kamehameha ran off with the votes, 61% to David Oakerhater’s 39% on the Lent Madness site. But on the St. Luke’s site, David Oakerhater eeked out a win 54% to 46%.

The next match up in the Saintly Sixteen is Cuthbert vs. Molly Brant.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

cuthbertCuthbert

Perhaps the most beautiful thing that is said of Saint Cuthbert is, “Cuthbert sought to follow Christ.” In this he is like many of the saints but his pattern of life was uniquely Christ-like in ways that shine forth through the centuries. No fewer than 22 lives of Cuthbert were written in the Middle Ages and his Christ-focused living is an example to all Christians.

In a Kingdom awash in both great violence and wealth, Cuthbert’s counter-cultural simplicity and kindness were a source of powerful spiritual inspiration. Stories were long told of the miracles of his life but also of enduring import were stories of his very human kindness. Upon his death, his legend grew and a significant cult emerged around his memory and relics..Read more here.

8fdb5086-619a-4ea0-b146-995510eff36c-250x300Molly Brant

Even as a young child, Molly Brant exhibited a gift for leadership. In 1754, at the age of 18, Molly traveled with her stepfather and other Mohawk leaders to Philadelphia to contest the fraudulent sale of Native territory. It was there, historians believe, that Molly got her first taste in the art of negotiation and compromise.

Molly continued to put these skills to use when she became a wife, mother (to 8 children!), and tribal leader. She frequently led the Bureau of Indian Affairs on behalf of her common-law husband Sir William Johnson when he was away. Although Molly received an education from Christian missionaries and was a devout Anglican, she retained a respectful devotion to many Mohawk customs, which allowed her to serve as a consensus-builder between two nations..Read more here.

Lent Madness: Dorcas vs. Frederick Douglass

February 27, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Dorcas vs. Frederick Douglass

Lent Madness 2012On the Lent Madness site, Bede lost 37% to Cuthbert’s winning 63%! On the St. Luke’s site, Bede remains venerable, winning 56%.

Today’s match up is Dorcas vs. Frederick Douglass.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

 

Raising_of_Tabitha-300x250Dorcas

Dorcas, which is not as bad a name as it sounds (it translates into Tabitha in Aramaic and Gazelle in English), made her first and only appearance in scripture after she had already died.

A lay leader of the early church in the port city of Joppa (now Tel Aviv-Yafo), Dorcas is known only by what was reported about her in Acts 9:36-42. She was described first as a disciple, and then as a person “devoted to good works and acts of charity.”.…Read more here. 

Frederick_Douglass_c1860s-252x300Frederick Douglass

Many people are familiar with Frederick Douglass’ work as an abolitionist in the nineteenth century. What is not as well-known is the depth of Douglass’ Christian faith. Douglass’ love of scripture and his fascination with the apocalyptic writing of Revelation was a guidepost in his quest for personal holiness and social transformation.

Born to an enslaved woman and a white slave owner in 1818 on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Douglass was sent to work for a Baltimore shipbuilder following his mother’s death when he was seven years old....Read more here.

Lent Madness: Bede vs. Cuthbert

February 26, 2015 Comments Off on Lent Madness: Bede vs. Cuthbert

Lent Madness 2012On the Lent Madness site, Kamehameha creamed William Laud capturing a whopping 84% of the votes! On the St. Luke’s site, however, a surprise…William Laud WON by 57%

Today’s match up is Bede vs. Cuthbert.

Remember: vote at Lent Madness here AND ALSO below the saint bios here so we see how the readers of the St. Luke in the Fields blog compare! Results of this match up will be reported the next day.

 

Nuremberg_Chronicle_Venerable_Bede-236x300The Venerable Bede

The Venerable Bede is among Christianity’s greatest scholars, having produced numerous commentaries on scripture, hagiographies of the saints, and studies of chronology and timekeeping. He is best known for his Ecclesiastical History of the English People, the premier source of information about the development of Christianity in England from the time of Augustine’s arrival in 597 until 731 CE.…Read more here. 

LMCuthbert-208x300Cuthbert of Lindisfarne

In the Venerable Bede’s The Life and Miracles of St. Cuthbert, Bishop of Lindesfarne, we read, “He was affable and pleasant in his character…he would introduce, in the meekest way, the spiritual benefits which the love of God had conferred upon himself. And this he took care to do in a covert manner, as if it had happened to another person.”

Cuthbert’s life, marked by miracles and adventure, was also a life of profound kindness....Read more here.

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